Trophy"Our Bulldogs are from Australian, English, South African, Swedish & Dutch blood lines".Trophy

 

 





 

 

Trophy"Our Bulldogs are from  Australian,  English,  South African,  Swedish  &  Dutch  blood lines".Trophy

We strive for type, balance and soundness the three important characteristics when assessing the

qualities of a British Bulldog as stated in the Standard "first impressions of the dog as a whole".

 

 

 

PUPPY WAITING LIST

/user/pawflash.gifPlease read below before you contact us/user/pawflash.gif

We appreciate the initial contact via e-mail, we will accordingly respond to your inquiry ASAP.

Please introduce yourself in a courteous manner.

Short emails "when is your next litter" or "how much for a pup" are deleted and not responded to.

We do not respond to hotmail, gmail, yahoo or similar address due to scammers in the past.

When you contact us please tell me about yourself, your home life, your working arrangements,

any children you may have now or plans for in the future.

Please, take time and in your email include answers to following questions:

  • What would be the main purpose for this dog?
  • Are you a breeder, if so how long have you been breeding.
  • Day time care, and your working arrangements.
  • Have you ever own a Bulldog?
  • If you already have a Bulldog who was the breeder
  • Have you researched the Bulldog breed?
  • How many dogs have you owned in the past ten years? If you have a dog at present please state the breed.
  • Do you have children?

 

Genuine enquiries only please, if we believe you have answered the question correctly we will then contact you and ask a few more to see if you are a suitable owner for one of our Eddybul puppies, thank you.                                              

TrophyTrophy

 

 

 

TrophyTrophy

 

 

TrophyTrophy

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

JUDGE MR M MORSE ~ VICTORIA ~ SEPTEMBER 2012

TrophyTrophy

 

TrophyTrophy

TEMORA & DISTRICT ALL BREEDS KENNEL CLUB 2012

Judge ~ Mrs L STEVENS  (ACT)

Judge ~ Mrs R ROBERTSON (NSW)

TrophyTrophy

DOGS ACT AMENITIES CHAMPIONSHIP SHOW

 

 

TrophyTrophy

 

TrophyTrophy

Trophy Trophy

 

Trophy Trophy

 

JUNEE KENNEL CLUB MAY 2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2006 four of our Bulldogs finished in the top six of the National Breed Pointscore for the British Bulldog on Dogz Online, with Eddybul By Design "DAWN" taking out first place.

 

      

 

We hope you enjoy your visit.

Feel free to have a look around and contact us ~ Laurie & Melanie ~ if you would like to know more about the British Bulldog  have a read down or just check out our site!

PLEASE DON'T FORGET TO Free AnimationsWHEN YOU ARE FINISHED TO LET US KNOW YOU HAVE VISITED,

YOU CAN FIND OUR VISITORS BOOK IS AT THE BOTTOM  OF OUR GUEST BOOK PAGE.

 

DO NOT BUY ANYTHING OTHER THAN A BRITISH (OR ENGLISH) BULLDOG.  Dogs called Australian, Regency or any other name are not the REAL THING and are not registered with the Kennel Control.

ONLY BUY YOUR BULLDOG from a breeder who is registered with their State Canine Control. In NSW your dog should be microchipped.

 

 

 

Example of dog

 

Example of  bitch

What is the purpose of the judge in the show ring? Like in any democratic set-up, the breeders have delegated their responsibility to measure their dogs to the official breed standard, to a group of people called ‘judges’. This judge, therefore, having been granted the privilege to judge the handiwork of the breeders and trainers, has a grave responsibility to bear in mind the seriousness of the job at hand. The judge has to contemplate and fully understand what impact his/her decisions in the ring can have, not only in the ring, but especially out of the ring. The judge has to adjudge the dog’s overall conformity with the standard, and any fault that would be emphasised by close-up, hands-on judging of the specimen, has to be measured against the dog’s impression as a whole – as prescribed by the closing paragraphs of the official standard. The seriousness of the fault, seen against the wholeness of the specimen, should determine the severity of the penalty awarded for such a deviation from the standard.

 

HEAD AND SKULL
The skull should be very large - the larger the better - and in circumference should measure (round in front of the ears) at least the height of the dog at the shoulders. Viewed from the front it should appear very high from the corner of the lower jaw to the apex of the skull, and also very broad and square. The cheeks should be well rounded and extended sideways beyond the eyes. Viewed at the side, the head should appear very high, and very short from its back to the point of the nose. The forehead should be flat, neither prominent, nor overhanging the face; the skin upon it and about the head very loose and well wrinkled. The projections of the frontal bones should be very prominent, broad square and high, causing a deep and wide indentation between the eyes termed the "stop". From the "stop" a furrow both broad and deep should extend up to the middle of the skull, being traceable to the apex. The face, measured from the front of the cheek - bone to the nose, should be as short as possible, and its skin should be deeply and closely wrinkled. The muzzle should be short, broad, turned upwards and very deep from the corner of the eye to the corner of the mouth. The nose should be large, broad and black, under no circumstances should it be liver coloured or brown: its top should be deeply set back almost between the eyes. The distance from the inner corner of the eye (or from the centre of the stop between the eyes) to the extreme tip of the nose should not exceed the length from the tip of the nose to the edge of the under lip. The nostrils should be large, wide and black, with a well-defined vertical line between them. The flews, called the "chop" should be thick, broad, pendant, and very deep, hanging completely over the lower jaw at the sides (not in front). They should join the under lip in front and quite cover the teeth. The jaws should be broad, massive and square, the lower jaw should project considerably in front of the upper and turn up. Viewed from the front, the various properties of the face must be equally balanced on either side of an imaginary line down the centre of the face.

 

Head & Skull

"Skull large in circumference, should measure round (in front of the ears) approximately height of dog at shoulder. Viewed from front appears very high from corner of lower jaw to apex of skull;also very broad and square.  Cheeks well-rounded and extended side ways beyond eyes. Viewed from side, head appears very high and short from back to point of nose.  Forehead flat with skin upon and about head, loose and wrinkled, neither prominent nor overhanging face. Projections of frontal bones prominent, broad, square and high; deep, wide indentation between eyes. From stop a furrow, both broad and deep extending to middle of skull being traceable to apex.  Face from front of cheek-bone to nose, short, skin wrinkled. Muzzle short, broad, turned upwards and very deep from corner of eye to corner of mouth. Nose and nostrils large, broad and black, under no circumstances liver colour, red or brown; top set back to eyes. Distance from inner corner of eye (or from center of stop between eyes) to extreme tip of nose exceeding length from tip of nose to edge of under lip. Nostrils large, wide and open, with well-defined vertical straight line between. Flews(chops) thick, broad, pendant and very deep, hanging completely over lower jaws at  sides, not in front. Joining under lip in front and quite covering teeth. Jaws broad, massive and square, lower jaw projecting in front of upper and turning up.  Nose roll must not interfere with the line of layback. Viewed from front, the various properties of the face must be equally balanced on either side of an imaginary line down center.

Orientation

The skull of the Bulldog Comparison of the skulls of the Bulldog (left) and the Dalmation (right).

 

EYES
Correct eye placement
The eyes seen from the front, should be situated low down in the skull, as far from the ears as possible. The eyes and "stop" should be in the same straight line, which should be at right angles to the furrow. They should be as wide apart as possible, provided their outer corners are within the outline of the cheeks. They should be quite round in shape, moderate size, neither sunken nor prominent, and in colour should be very dark - almost, if not quite, black - showing no white when looking directly forward.

EARS
The ears should be set high on the head - i.e the front inner edge of each ear should (as viewed from the front) join the outline of the skull at the top corner of such outline, so as to place them as wide apart, and as high and as far from the eyes as possible. In size, they should be small and thin, the shape termed "rose ear" is correct, and folds inwards at its back, the upper or front edge curving over outwards and backwards, showing part of the inside of the burr.

 

 

 

MOUTH
The jaw should be broad and square and have six small front teeth between the canines in an even row. The canine teeth or tusks wide apart. The teeth should not be seen when the mouth is closed. The teeth should be large and strong. When viewed from the front, the underjaw should be centrally under the upper jaw to which it should also be parallel.

Mouth/Jaws

 

 

Orientation

 

Under Jaw

 The lower jaw should be under shot with a slight upward turn. The bite should be square.
FAULT: The jaw has an even or scissor bite, or is under shot in excess (more than 1 inch). Wry jaw is a disqualification.

 

BITE/JAWS - The jaws should be massive, very broad, square and "undershot", the lower jaw projecting considerably in front of the upper jaw and turning up.

Skull formation showing correct swing of jaw.

A wry or crooked jaw is a serious fault.

 

The correct jaw, so eagerly sought after in the fancy, with the upward thrust, retaining the curve throughout.

FAULTY JAWS

 

Little turn-up
long, straight with
exposed canines.
Incorrect formation
turns up only
at front.

TEETH - The teeth should be large and strong, with the canine teeth or tusks wide apart, and the six small teeth in front, between the canines, in and even, level row.

Correct Incorrect

CORRECT JAW

NECK


Should be moderate in length (rather short than long), very thick, deep and strong. It should be well arched at the back, with much loose, thick and wrinkled skin about the throat, forming a dewlap on each side, from the lower jaw to the chest.

 

FOREQUARTERS
The shoulders should be broad, sloping and deep, very powerful and muscular, giving the appearance of having been "tacked on" to the body. The brisket should be capacious, round and very deep from the top of the shoulders to the lowest part where it joins the chest, and be well let down between forelegs. It should be very large in diameter and round behind the forelegs (not flat-sided, the ribs being well rounded). The forelegs should be very stout and strong, set wide apart, thick, muscular and straight, with well developed forearms, presenting a rather bowed outline, but the bones of the legs should be large and straight, not bandy or curved. They should be rather short in proportion to the hind-legs, but not so short as to make the back appear long, or detract from the dog's activity, and so cripple him. The elbows should be low, and stand well away from the ribs. The pasterns should be short, straight and strong.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Shoulders broad, sloping and deep, very powerful and muscular giving the appearance of  being "tacked on" to the body."

 

 

Shock absorption

Because the Bulldog carries most of his weight on his front legs, he needs some form of shock absorption during movement. This is provided in two ways:
  • the shoulder bone is connected to the body by means of muscles and connective tissue (i.e. tacked on to the body). The flexibility and resilience of the shoulder muscles and connective tissue helps to absorb shock during movement, provided it is strong, well developed and well connected to the body.
  • the shoulder bone (scapula) and the upper arm (humerus) forms an angle which allows for absorption of shock during movement. If the shoulder is not sloping enough (i.e. too upright), the movement will be stilted and uneven.

Correct Shoulders


CHEST & BRISKET

 

 "Chest wide, laterally round, prominent and deep. Brisket capacious, round and very deep from top of shoulders to lowest part where it joins the chest.  Well let down between the forelegs.   Large in diameter, round behind forelegs (not flat-sided, ribs well rounded)."

Orientation

                

 

Correct chest & brisket (barrel shape)

 

Flat chest showing no brisket

 

BODY
The chest should be very wide, laterally round, prominent, and deep, making the dog appear very broad and short-legged in front. The body should be well ribbed up behind, with the belly tucked up and not pendulous. The back should be short and strong, very broad at the shoulders, and comparatively narrow at the loins. There should be a slight fall to the back close behind the shoulders (its lowest part), whence the spine should rise to the loins (the top of which should be higher than the top of the shoulders), thence curving curving again more suddenly to the tail, forming an arch - a distinctive characteristic of the breed termed "roach back".

 

FORELEGS

"Forelegs very stout and strong, well developed, set wide apart, thick, muscular and straight, presenting a rather bowed outline, but bones of leg large and straight, not bandy nor curved and short in proportion to hind legs, but not so short as to make the back appear long or detract from dog's activity and so to cripple him.   Elbows low and standing well away from ribs.  Pasterns short, straight and strong."

 

Orientation

 

 

Correct front 

"Forelegs very stout and strong, well developed, set wide apart, thick, muscular and straight"

 

 

 

Wide front

 

 

Narrow front

 

 

Fiddle front

".. not bandy nor curved"

 

It should therefore be obvious that if a pear-shaped dog (wider in the shoulders than the hips) is not pear-shaped, it is a major deviation from the standard and at the same time distracts severely from the overall impression of the dog as a representative specimen of its breed worth receiving a placing at a breed show. In the same vane, a dog that is so cripple that anyone seeing it moving can pick it up, has a fault of a degree that severely compromises its balance as a whole specimen. By allowing these deviations to not only pass by, but to even award first prizes to such specimens, does not only harm the rest of the specimens that are without such fault(s), it endangers the integrity of the breed, its breeders and the application of the standard as a blue-print to strive towards, as well.

COAT
Should be fine in texture, short, close and smooth (hard only from the shortness and closeness, not wiry)

Correct Coat Texture

 

 BACK

"Slight fall to back close behind shoulders (lowest part) whence the spine should rise to loins (top higher than top of shoulder), curving again more suddenly to tail, forming arch (termed roach back) - a distinctive characteristic of the breed."

 

Orientation

 

 

Correct back

 

Straight back (fault)

 

Camel back (fault)

 

 

Sway back (fault)

 

 

TAIL

"Set on low, jutting out rather straight and then turning downwards.  Round, smooth and devoid of fringe or coarse hair.  Moderate in length - rather short than long - thick at root,tapering quickly to a fine point.   Downward carriage (not having a decided upward curve at end) and never carried above back."

 

 

Correct tail 

"Set on low, jutting out rather straight and then turning downwards."

"Moderate in length - rather short than long - thick at root, tapering quickly to a fine point."

 

 

Screw tail - not a fault

 

 

 

 

Gay tail (fault)

".... and never carried above back."

COLOUR

The colour should be whole or smut (that is, a whole colour with a black mask or muzzle). The only colours ( which should be brilliant and pure of their sort ) are whole colors - viz., brindles, reds, with their varieties, fawns, fallows etc., white and also pied ( i.e. a combination of white with any other of the foregoing colours ). Dudley, black and black with tan are extremely undesirable colours.

SIZE - The most desirable weight for the Bulldog is:

25 kg (55lbs.) for a dog and

22.7 kg (50 lbs.) for a bitch.

FAULTS

Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree.

NOTE

Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

HINDQUARTERS
The legs should be large and muscular, and longer in proportion than the forelegs, so as to elevate the loins. The hocks should be slightly bent and well let down, so as to be long and muscular from the loins to the point of the hock. The lower part of the leg should be short, straight and strong. The stifles should be round and turn slightly outwards away from the body. The hocks are thereby made to approach each other, and the hind feet to turn outwards.

 

 

 

 Orientation

 

Normal hip joint

Normal hip joint (left) and hip dysplasia (right).

 

HINDQUARTERS

"Legs large and muscular, longer in proportion than forelegs, so as to elevate loins.  Hocks slightly bent,well let down, leg long  and muscular from loins to hock; short, straight,strong lower part. Stifles round  and turned slightly outwards away from body.  Hock thereby made to approach each other and hind feet to turn outwards."

Correct hind legs


 

Note that with correct hind legs, the knee joint (stifle) and the heel (hock joint) should be slightly bent and the lower part of the leg from the hock to the feet (the pasterns) should be short.

 

 Straight stifles  (fault)

With straight stifles of the hind legs, there is no flexion (bending) of  the stifles or hocks, resulting in a stilted, unnatural movement

 

 Sickle hocks (fault)

With sickle hocks of the hind legs, there is an over flexion of the hock joint which gives the impression a 'sickle'.  The result is an unnatural, 'waterpumping' action of the hind legs during movemen

Illustration of the movement of a dog with normal hind legs (left) and a dog with sickle hocks (right).

The dog on the right with the sickle hocks can not extend his hocks properly during movement and this will restrict the driving force of his hind legs.

 

Correct hind legs

Cow hocked hind legs

"Stifles round  and turned slightly outwards away from body.  Hocks thereby made to approach each other and hind feet to turn outwards." Looking from the front, the hind legs will be visible between the front legs.

Stifles too close together, resulting in weak and unnatural hind movement.

 

 

Pigeon-toed hind legs

Wide hind legs

Hocks are turned outward in stead of in and toes turned inwards in stead of out, resulting in difficult and very unnatural movement.

Hind legs too wide apart, caused by an inadequate 'pearshape' of the body

 

FEET

 

The hind feet, like the forefeet, should be round and compact, with the toes well split up and the knuckles prominent. The forefeet should be straight and turn very slightly outward, of medium size and moderately round. The toes compact and thick, being well split up, making the knuckles prominent and high.
 

 Illustration of different types of front feet

Correct feet

  Splayed feet

Hare feet

 

TAIL

The tail, termed the "stern", should be set on low, jut out rather straight, then turn downwards. It should be round, smooth and devoid of fringe or coarse hair. It should be moderate in length - rather short than long- thick at the root, and tapering quickly to a fine point. It should have a downward carriage (not having a decided curve at the end), and the dog should not be able to raise it over its back.

GAIT/MOVEMENT

From its formation the dog has a peculiar heavy and constrained gait, appearing to walk with short quick steps on the tips of its toes, its hind feet not being lifted high, but appearing to skim the ground, and running with theright shoulder rather advanced, similar to the manner of horse in cantering.

 

 

"Peculiarly heavy and constrained, appearing to walk with short, quick steps on tips of toes, hind feet not lifted high, appearing to skim ground, running with one or other shoulder rather advanced.  Soundness of movement of the utmost importance."

 

 Illustration of movement

   Normal                    Paddling                            Weaving 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is an article giving an explanation as to why breeders of the past bred the distinctive features into the British Bulldog and what their function was.

 

by Mr A Hartley

 

THE BULLDOG MUST BE PEAR-SHAPED, THAT IS, VERY WIDE AT THE SHOULDERS AND VERY FINE HINDQUARTERS, THAT IS WHY ALL THESE PARTS FIT TOGETHER.

 

Let's start with the UNDERJAW. It should have a good turnup, very wide and square. From the top of the underjaw to the top of the nose it should have a layback of 45 degrees and should be very large and the nostrils very wide, Then you go to the STOP, which should be very deep and much lower then the tip of the nose. We will come back to this later. Now, FACE AND JAW should be short, that is where he gets the strength from - it is like a bit of timber - a short bit of timber is much stronger than a long piece. He's got to be UNDERSHOT - the bottom jaw is about 1/2 to 3/4 inch longer than the top one, the canine teeth should turn a little out, this acts like a fish hook so he can hang on to the flesh. CHOPS should be very deep and hang well over the bottom jaw even when his mouth is open, they also run to the dewlap which I will come back to.

Now let's come to the EYES - very wide apart to give him good vision. On each side of the eye he should have two frontal bones on each side of his eyebrows - these should be very large and prominent for a reason ( I will come back to this) -they are very special.

Let's come to the EARS. They used to be pricked ears, so when the owner took him into the fighting ring he used to hold on to them before he let the dog go. They found out when the dogs drew blood, it would get into his ears and he would let go. The same as when you wash your dog and he gets water in them - he shakes his head, so then they brought in the button ear but when the dog got held on to bull, the ear would fall over his eye and cut off his vision - so then they brought in the rose ear which is the correct ear

 

The ears should be set high in the head, the front inner edge of each ear joining the outline of the skull at the top back corner of skull, so as to place them as wide apart, and as high, and as far from the eyes as possible. In size they should be small and thin. The shape termed "rose ear" is the most desirable. The rose ear folds inward at its back lower edge, the upper front edge curving over, outward and backward, showing part of the inside of the burr. (The ears should not be carried erect or prick-eared or buttoned and should never be cropped).

ROSE EARS

When viewed from the front and side, top of ears should be level with
top outline of the skull with the burr partially exposed and the entire
edge of the ear visible.

 

FAULTY EARS

 

On to the SKULL. It should be very wide and fall with plenty of fine wrinkle and should have a very deep furrow running down the centre of his skull from the apex of his skull to the bottom of the deep stop, the running between the frontal bones. I said I would come back to the nose and stop. So I will now give you all the reasons for the wrinkle, furrow, frontal bones, stop, nose and chops. When the Bulldog gets hold of the bull and fetches blood, it runs down the fine wrinkle to the furrow in the centre of his head between the frontal bones as these project well above the eyes, it is impossible for the blood to run into his eyes. Then it runs down to the stop which has a roll running over it - I said before the nose has to be much higher than the stop, so you can see it would be impossible for the blood to run to the nose and cut off his breathing - as this is the only way the Bulldog can breathe when holding a bull. As I said before he had to have a layback of 45 degrees so you can see when his mouth is on the bull his nose is about 1/4 inch away from the bull. This is why he has to have a layback of 45 degrees to breathe. When the blood has run down the wrinkle, past the frontal bones to the stop, it then runs down the deep chop which is hanging well over the bottom jaw, even when the mouth is open - this stops the blood running into his mouth and congealing. So after it has run down the chops, it runs down the dewlap to the ground, so you can see with such a short face and big tongue and a mouthful of flesh, how impossible it would be to breathe through his mouth. This is why he has to depend on his 45 degree layback of nose.

Now, the FRONT should be very wide in shoulder, muscular with a very deep round brisket. This is so when he gets down to spring at the bull, the brisket touches the ground and gives him even balance. If he has no brisket he would go off balance, and it would be much harder for him to spring.

FRONT LEGS Should be very strong and straight and look like they have been tacked on. The elbows should be well away from the ribs and if you put your fists around at the back, you could bury them between his rib and elbow which I will come back to later on.

 

INCORRECT FRONTS

 

 

 

 

INCORRECT HINDQUARTERS
 

 

 

 

CORRECT HINDQUARTERS

 

NECK should be moderate in length, not too long or short but should be very thick and arched. From the top of his shoulders he should have a roach, running right up to the top of the loin, then running with a nice curve to a very low set TAIL which has to be straight. He has to have a lovely SPRING OF RIB and a lovely DEPTH OF RIB from the shoulder to the bottom of his chest and has to have a big TUCK UP of belly or loin from the end of his rib. He has to have a very good turn of stifle to the point of his hocks; from the point of the hocks to his toe he should be very straight.

 

I said before he has to have a good arch of neck and roach turning right down to his tail and also to have a tuck up of loin and turn of stifle. Just try to follow me from now on. When the Bulldog gets a good hold of the bull he turns himself into a complete ball. So when his hind legs turn under the turn of stifle then fits right up into the tuck up of loin and from the point of the hock to the tip of his toes go right along the side of his ribs his feet fit inside the elbows and ribs, then his front legs turn back so you can see he is wrapped up into a very small parcel. When the bull throws him around it is impossible for him to break his neck, back or legs.

 

 

 

The skin around his neck should be very loose, so that when the bull rolls him around on the ground, the skin rolls too,I said before he has to have a good arch of neck and roach turning right down to his tail and also to have a tuck up of loin and turn of stifle. Just try to follow me from now on. When the Bulldog gets a good hold of the bull he turns himself into a complete ball. So when his hind legs turn under the turn of stifle then fits right up into the tuck up of loin and from the point of the hock to the tip of his toes go right along the side of his ribs his feet fit inside the elbows and ribs, then his front legs turn back so you can see he is wrapped up into a very small parcel. When the bull throws him around it is impossible for him to break his neck, back or legs so this stops him getting cuts.

 

 

The Body

  • The chest development is of as great importance for strength and endurance to the dog as to the athlete, and flabbiness equally detrimental. The chest should be wide, laterally round, prominent and deep, making the dog appear very broad and short-legged in front. The back should be short and strong, very broad at the shoulders and comparatively narrow at the loins.

    Viewed from above, the correct Bulldog wide shoulders, barrel ribs and the narrow pelvic area give the characteristic wedge or "Pear-Shaped outline". The body should be broad and heavy in front, narrower and lighter behind as in such a top view the powerful neck and shoulders result particularly noticeable. The body should be well ribbed up behind, with the belly "Tucked-Up" and not pendulous.
     
    1. A line of a deep brisket well tucked-up at loin. The deep, capacious brisket allows ample room for full lung development. The clean cut-up at loin allows the fullest freedom to the hindquarters with the minimum of weight, and gives a line that at once stands for strength, activity and beauty combined.
      The front view of the ribs in flat-sided in a well-developed individual. The ribs are well rounded at the fullest behind the shoulders, giving ample capacity for the full development of the organs of the chest. A Bulldog with this formation will always give the direct impression of strength and power, nmever associated with flat sides and ahallow brisket.
    2. A pendolous and flabby belly with a shallow chest and brisket line. A Bulldog characterized by that construction surely does not possess much strength because poorly developed. The brisket shallowness in fact does not allow sufficient space fot the full development of lungs and organs of the chest. The clumsiness or weight under loin interferes with the free action of the hindquarters, thus affecting the activity of the dog. The whole line of the brisket and tuck-up which ought to be one of the most beautiful lines of the animal is rendered uninteresting and meaningless.
      The front view of the ribs in flat-sided in a badly-developed individual. The ribs are characterized by insufficient roundness.

 

Lets talk on the roll of the Bulldog and the gait. It is impossible for the Bulldog to roll and gait perfectly, unless he has a pear-shaped body.

It takes four things to give a perfect gait.

Big shoulders

Roach,
Back and fine hindquarters
Cut-up of loin
 
 
 

Now what makes him roll and gait?

Firstly let me say a Bulldog would be the hardest of any breed to gait when he is going away from you - you see four legs he is so wide in front and narrow in back.

When he is coming back you see only two - that is if he has a very deep brisket.

When you look over the top of a Bulldog he is all front, pear-shaped and with fine hindquarters.

The judge’s responsibility does not end with the obvious, though. Because the judge does hands-on judging, opening the mouth, pulling the ears, feeling the testicles, lifting up the feet, inspecting the eyes and skin, the judge has to take such finding into consideration as well. Dog breeders and showers who exhibit their specimens at shows are most likely going to breed with those specimens. Many of them are influenced by the judges’ opinions of their dogs – for breed judges are supposed to be ‘experts’ at interpreting the standard and applying it to live specimens of the breed! The judge has the responsibility to judge each specimen not only on what is obvious to the spectator (from afar), but what the judge discovers while examining the dog up close and personal, as well. Why do judges get their hands dirty by touching show specimens (not all exhibitors wash and powder their dogs prior to entering the ring)? Why do they open dogs’ mouths and run the risk of being bitten? Why do they bend their backs and knees to examine dogs standing on the ground, running the risk of lower-back pain? Why, indeed? Surely, when ignoring the findings of close inspection, judges could just as well get themselves some ringside seats, let the dogs walk their triangles, and award prizes accordingly!

The judge has the responsibility to judge the specimen’s conformity to the breed standard while taking into account the WHOLE dog – that includes such features as alignment of jaws; complete set of testicles; absence of haw and entropion in the eyes; no loose soft pallet; no slipped patella; no sickle hocks; correct eye, nose and feet pigmentation, etc – in short, any genetically transferable trait that may compromise the soundness of this man-made breed. It is the judge’s responsibility to identify faults in a dog and weigh them up against the dog’s embodiment of the standard as a whole.

Thus, by identifying the faults and awarding the correct penalty to each, you are not ‘fault judging’, to the contrary, you are doing your job!

Failing to properly determine the over-all quality of a show dog, taking into consideration the type and degree of deviations it has as far as the standard is concerned, is not fault judging but FAULTY judging!

The act of judging should not be taken lightly – like a parliamentarian, you are representing the breeders who expect a certain degree of knowledge and aptness from you as a judge. Do not let us lose our faith in our judges as we have lost our faith in the majority of our parliamentarians…

In parting, when judging dogs (like judging anything else in live), do remember these words from Sam Rayburn (1882-1961): "Any jackass can kick down a barn, but it takes a good carpenter to build one."

 

If you would like more information on British Bulldogs have a look at Bulldogs Australia on our links page.

 

copyright S.den Boer

Trophy"Our Bulldogs are from Australian,  English,  South African,  Swedish   & Dutch  blood lines".Trophy

 

 

 

 

Home & Bulldog Standard  About Us & The History  Bulldog Males  Bulldog Bitchs

1st Album Of Our Bulldogs  2nd Album Of Our Bulldogs  Mervander Thundering Home  Wyecaple Good To Go (u.k)

Silver Satisfaction  Pups & Bulldog Health  Sample Of My Photos  Bulldog Information

Owners, Friends & Family  CHAMPIONS & SHOW RESULTS  Guest Book & Contact  Links Page



Contact Details
Laurie Edwards
Holder, ACT, Australia
Email : eddybul@bigpond.net.au
146291


All Content Copyright
Dogz Online - Dogs, Breeders, Puppies